DEL-BOURREE BACH

Del-Bourree Bach has been active in the arts community for over 30 years. Starting as an illustrator in New York, his work regularly appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, National Review and numerous other publications. Among his other illustration credits are two books by the late Isaac Asimov and work for the New York Philharmonic and Ringling Brothers Barnum and Bailey Circus. Eventually he decided to devote his full time to painting and pulled away from the more commercial side of art. Since then his work has received over 150 awards in worldwide competition and his paintings are included in private, corporate and museum collections in the U.S. and abroad. 

Del is a signature member of many professional arts organizations, including, the American Society of Marine Artists, Artists for Conservation, Society of Animal Artists, National Oil and Acrylic Painters Society, National Society of Painters in Casein and Acrylic, American Artists Professional League (Fellow), Allied Artists of America, Audubon Artists, The Copley Society of Boston, Providence Art Club and the Salmagundi Club of New York, where he exhibits regularly and has served on the Board of Directors and Jury of Awards. He is one of nine artists nationwide to be named to the PaintAmerica Masters Circle.

Articles about Del and his work have appeared in many art publications including American Artist, The Artists Magazine, International Artist, American Art Collector, Fine Art Connoisseur and Watercolor Magic.

His work is best described as contemporary realism and although he is perhaps best known for his paintings of the sea and the life around and in it, Del does not limit his subject matter, but always looks for new inspiration in the world around him. Basically self-taught, he is a keen observer and although he is for the most part a studio painter, he sketches and photographs in the field and occasionally enjoys plein-air painting. 

After 30 years in New York City, Del moved his home and studio to Pirate Hill in Mystic, Connecticut.